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The Most Dangerous Speed Traps in Houston

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For better or worse, Houston is a sprawl. Our giant tangling freeways and numerous back roads are usually clogged with traffic as people try to move from the suburbs to the city and back at almost every hour of the day. Eventually, you get so used to the gridlock that when you have an opportunity to speed, it almost feels too good to pass up! You’re going 75 mph in a 60-mph zone and it feels amazing … and then the red and blue lights start flashing.

Speeding occurs everywhere, but certain places are more dangerous than others. When my clients come into the office, there are certain streets, highways, and intersections that seem to come up all the time. When you’re heading home this weekend, make sure you’re extra careful around these infamous speed traps!

North Shepherd and Interstate 10

When it’s not torn up from construction, Shepherd can be a great route back to I-10, especially at night when the traffic is light. Shepherd also happens to be one of the main routes to the freeway from some of Houston’s more popular drinking spots, and the cops know it.

Once you cross the train tracks, all those gas stations and restaurant parking lots become ideal hiding spots for cops just waiting for an easy ticket or arrest. Getting pulled over in this area on a Saturday night is very likely to come with a requested field sobriety test. No matter how empty the road may be, your best bet is to stick with the speed limit until you hit the freeway.

The 610 South Loop

This treacherous stretch of freeway heading from Meyerland towards NRG Stadium and 288 is one of HPD’s favorite places to nab careless drivers. This particularly hilly stretch of 610 provides cops with some ideal hiding places to sneak up on speeders and suspected drunk drivers before they even have a clue. This is especially pronounced before and after games/events.

 

Sam Houston Tollway

“Screw it, let’s just take the toll road!”

It always seems like a great idea at the time, especially when you’re averaging 30 mph on I-10 and you’re dying to get home. But if you’re not careful, taking the Sam Houston Tollway (a.k.a. Beltway 8) can be anything but convenient. As you head west getting closer to Highway 290, the cops keep increasing in numbers and are always positioned just right so that they can nab you going 80 before you can even see them.

Just take a look at the gas station parking lots right off the toll road! On a Saturday night, there’s almost always someone lit up by two cop cars, standing on one leg, and, almost definitely, on their way to jail. Don’t be that guy. Pay the tolls and drive the speed limit.

Just About Anything That Ends in “Village”

Houston Fact: Certain parts of Harris County are incorporated as their own cities. Katy, Memorial Villages, Jersey Village, and Cy-Fair are just a few examples. As their own small cities, these areas also have their own police departments and they love to give out tickets.

Be very mindful of any signage that says you’re leaving the city limits. Once you’re out of Harris County, you’re very likely to run into a swarm of bored cops just waiting for something to do. Jersey Village and the Memorial Villages are particularly notorious for handing out expensive speeding tickets for even the most minor speeding offenses.

Jones Road near Jersey Village, and Voss heading towards Westheimer can be particularly dicey, especially at night. If getting to the freeway involves a brief detour out of city limits, make sure you follow every random speed change down to the last mile.

Hire Defense That Goes the Extra Mile

Most arrests begin with a simple traffic stop. If driving 15 mph over the speed limit turns in to a DWI or drug arrest, Thiessen Law Firm is here to help. If you or a loved one are facing criminal charges, don’t wait a second longer. Contact Thiessen Law Firm today for your free consultation and get back in the fast lane to freedom!

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